Category Archives: J. Glaze

Maximizing An Artist’s Studio Potential


Being a recording artist isn’t easy.  There are only a few short seconds for an artist to command attention and convince listeners that their song is worth hearing.   Capturing a great performance is the most important aspect of creating competitive recordings.  And it is the producer’s responsibility to make sure that the artist reaches his/her greatest potential.  Catering to the psychological and physiological needs of an artist will help ensure the best possible recordings.  Factors like comfort, encouragement, and positivity can make or break a recording session.

This might seem obvious to some, but I cannot stress enough the importance of a comfortable working environment.  Climate control is often overlooked, but it can affect your vocalist’s performance greatly if your room is too hot or too cold.  Lighting is another undervalued factor.  Some people find it difficult to feel creative under harsh florescent lighting, regarding it as sterile.  I like to set a soft, comfortable vibe by using candles or light switches with dimmers.  But be warned, changing lighting or temperature mid-session can alter a singers intonation.  Learn to get familiar with what each artist requires to feel the most comfortable, and in turn perform their best in the booth. Continue reading

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Endurance Race vs. A Sprint

This post is in response to a popular question: “What else should I be doing to ‘make it’ in the music industry?”

Without getting caught up on what it means to “make it,” usually my answer is, “do more of what you are already doing. If it’s great, eventually people will notice.” This goes for beat-makers, producers, engineers, rappers, singers, painters, photographers, directors, or anyone else with a creative passion.

A career in the arts requires a lifetime of dedication. Continue reading

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Endurance Race vs. A Sprint


This post is in response to a popular question: “What else should I be doing to ‘make it’ in the music industry?”

Without getting caught up on what it means to “make it,” usually my answer is, “do more of what you are already doing. If it’s great, eventually people will notice.” This goes for beat-makers, producers, engineers, rappers, singers, painters, photographers, directors, or anyone else with a creative passion.

A career in the arts requires a lifetime of dedication. As described in my previous articles, the music industry is increasingly competitive due to the digital revolution that took place in the 90’s and the transformation that ensued in the 21 century. Talent is important, but in most cases, success is determined by persistence. I have been producing music for over 12 years, and even though I earn a living creating music, all my paying gigs are temporary. Just like everyone else, I am constantly working to expand my business and accomplish larger goals. Continue reading

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My Favorite Vocal Plug-ins


With thousands of options to choose from, deciding on a digital vocal chain can be a daunting task. “Vocal chain” refers to the specific sequence of hardware or plug-ins that process vocals before they end up in your mix. In keeping with the theme of embracing technology, I am going to cover a few of my favorite plug-ins that are a fraction of the price of their hardware counterparts. I use these plug-ins quite frequently.  Continue reading

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Getting the Most Out of Each Release


The rise of the .mp3 and decline of CD sales over the past 10 years has severely impacted the monetization of music releases. One major change has been the growing trend of singles becoming more profitable than album sales, per song. But instead of viewing this change as a problem, it is better to embrace technology and realize that without digital stores like iTunes, many of us would not have the opportunity to sell music without signing a major record deal. Regardless, it is important for artists to capitalize on each release as much as possible. And here is how:

Too often, artists make it their goal to release an album. Traditionally, this sounds like a great idea. If it were 1990, creating one album might lead to fame and riches. Back then, getting into a studio and recording an album was reserved for a chosen few, as opposed to today, where everybody and their brother has an album they recorded in their bedroom. Given the over saturation of the current market, shooting for the top of the charts on a debut release is wishful thinking. I have seen countless artists rely on their first album to be profitable, only to realize they need to release much more than just one project to create traction. Unless an artist already has a huge established fan base like Lady Gaga or Jay-Z, knocking 10 dollars out of a fan’s pocket proves increasingly difficult. Instead, it is better to focus on one single song that best represents your sound and promote that for a while. Even top selling artists stand to benefit by releasing one song per month for a year, instead of a 12 song album once a year. This is because it is easier to get one dollar per month from a fan, rather than 12 dollars all at once. Continue reading

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